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Arthur Fine

The shaky game : Einstein, realism, and the quantum theory

Einstein's disagreement with quantum mechanics is often presented in a disparaging manner - as if he had somehow lost the plot. In The Shaky Game Arthur Fine shows that this is an unfair characterisation. In the first half of this set of essays he looks in detail at Einstein's philosophical views, how they changed with time, and how they related to what other people thought. In particular he examines how Einstein's views are reflected in the EPR paper. It's worth reading if you want see why Einstein's position wasn't such a dead end as is often claimed.

Sometimes the book does suffer a bit from the fact that it's a set of essays written at separate times. For instance, early on Fine mentions some of his ideas called 'Prism Models'. I expected him to expand on these ideas in the second half of the book, where he gets on to presenting his own ideas on the subject. However, instead he describes his 'Natural Ontological Attitude' - a way of looking at the realism-antirealism dispute. I also found that this discussion was rather philosophical for my taste - if you like such philosophising then you're likely to find plenty to interest you, but I prefer things to be a bit more definite.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 224 pages  
ISBN: 0226249492
Salesrank: 2213798
Weight:0.91 lbs
Published: 1996 University of Chicago Press
Amazon price $34.00
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 232 pages  
ISBN: 0226249492
Salesrank: 1897512
Weight:0.91 lbs
Published: 1996 University Of Chicago Press
Amazon price £24.73
Marketplace:New from £18.25:Used from £15.07
Buy from Amazon.co.uk
Amazon.ca info
Paperback 224 pages  
ISBN: 0226249492
Salesrank: 1268850
Weight:0.91 lbs
Published: 1996 University Of Chicago Press
Amazon price CDN$ 30.71
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 30.71:Used from CDN$ 25.21
Buy from Amazon.ca





Product Description
In this new edition, Arthur Fine looks at Einstein's philosophy of science and develops his own views on realism. A new Afterword discusses the reaction to Fine's own theory.

"What really led Einstein . . . to renounce the new quantum order? For those interested in this question, this book is compulsory reading."—Harvey R. Brown, American Journal of Physics

"Fine has successfully combined a historical account of Einstein's philosophical views on quantum mechanics and a discussion of some of the philosophical problems associated with the interpretation of quantum theory with a discussion of some of the contemporary questions concerning realism and antirealism. . . . Clear, thoughtful, [and] well-written."—Allan Franklin, Annals of Science

"Attempts, from Einstein's published works and unpublished correspondence, to piece together a coherent picture of 'Einstein realism.' Especially illuminating are the letters between Einstein and fellow realist Schrödinger, as the latter was composing his famous 'Schrödinger-Cat' paper."—Nick Herbert, New Scientist

"Beautifully clear. . . . Fine's analysis is penetrating, his own results original and important. . . . The book is a splendid combination of new ways to think about quantum mechanics, about realism, and about Einstein's views of both."—Nancy Cartwright, Isis