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Leonard Mlodinow

Euclid's Window

In this book Mloninlow describes the history of geometry and its relation to other branches of science. The book progresses via the stories of five main characters, starting with Euclid and his 'Elements', then showing how Descartes linked geometry and algebra. It then looks at how Gauss initiated work on noneuclidean geometries, and shows how Einstein used this in the development of general relativity. The last part of the book concerns string theory and its development by Ed Witten. Mlodinow maintains his sense of humour throughout giving a very readable book, which is understandable by the non-technical reader.

Although the book has five main characters, it is not restricted to these people, rather it gives a history of much of geometry, in particular the development and use of noneuclidean geometries. Mlodinow explains the geometrical concepts as required, and does so very well. Sometimes I felt that another diagram would have helped the reader, but maybe this would have changed the book from one on the history of geometry to trying to teach the reader geometry, which would have changed the style of the book.

Amazon.com info
Paperback 320 pages  
ISBN: 0141009098
Salesrank: 3257070
Published: 2007 Penguin Books, Limited (UK)
Amazon price $7.53
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Amazon.co.uk info
Paperback 320 pages  
ISBN: 0141009098
Salesrank: 203654
Weight:0.49 lbs
Published: 2003 Penguin
Amazon price £9.99
Marketplace:New from £3.37:Used from £1.44
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Amazon.ca info
Paperback 320 pages  
ISBN: 0141009098
Salesrank: 4477687
Weight:0.49 lbs
Published: 2003 Penguin UK
Amazon price CDN$ 10.19
Marketplace:New from CDN$ 9.81:Used from CDN$ 0.98
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Product Description
Through "Euclid's Window", Leonard Mlondinow brilliantly and delightfully leads us on a journey through five revolutions in geometry, from the Greek concept of parallel lines to the latest notions of hyperspace. This new, refreshing, alternative history of maths reveals how simple questions anyone might ask about space in the living room or in some other galaxy have been the hidden engine of science's highest achievements.